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Friday, March 22, 2019

FAQ

Ski Lifts

We have a video available on this very topic, which we encourage you to view, by clicking here.

Detachable lifts are unique in that they operate at higher speeds than fixed grip lifts, often at double or triple the speed. As a result, loading and unloading these lifts would be difficult and potentially dangerous due to the higher speeds. To solve this issue, the lifts are designed to permit the chairs or gondola cabins to detach from the cable when in the terminals to allow for a lower speed to load and unload, and then reattach to travel at the highest speed possible.

Inside the terminals, the carrier will travel the contour by wheels mounted on its grip and be supported by rails and tracks overhead. When leaving, the chair will accelerate to line speed by means of wheels, that apply friction to the top of the carrier's grip plate. The wheels are driven by gears or belts, with each one faster than the last to allow the carrier to accelerate to line speed. At that time, sheave wheels will guide the haul rope into position and an overhead rail will apply pressure on the operator arm of the grip to open its mobile jaw. The mobile jaw is designed to naturally close as it is fitted with a spring pack (which you can see hanging to the left side of the grip). The spring forces the grip to close and apply the needed pressure to securely grip the haul rope. The cable will align under and move into the open grip. The overhead rail will then slope in the opposite direction to allow the mobile jaw to close onto the cable. The carrier then exits the terminal, attached and supported by the haul rope. When detaching at the top of the mountain, the same operation occurs in reverse.
by Shane Séguin
Aerial lifts are chairlifts, gondolas, trams and funitels. Other types can exist but these are the most common varieties.
by Shane Séguin
Surface lifts consist of magic carpets (conveyor belts), platter lifts and t-bars. There exist other types but these are the most commonly found.
by Shane Séguin
A hybrid, combi or telemix lift is a detachable lift that consists of both chairs and gondola cabins. Typically on the average hybrid lift, for every 3 or 4 chairs, there will be 1 gondola cabin cabin separating the group. Loading and unloading occur in different areas in the terminals. These lifts offer the best of both worlds, in that they offer the convienence of chairlifts (not requiring riders to remove their skis or snowboards) and gondolas (for a warmer and sheltered ride up the mountain).
by Shane Séguin
A detachable lift will typically operate at speeds of 5-6 metres per second (18-21km/h). When the chair or gondola cabin is in the terminals for loading and unloading, they will circulate at speeds of 1 metre per second (3.6km/h) or slower.
by Shane Séguin
A fixed grip lift will typically operate at speeds of 2-3 metres per second (7-11km/h).  The speed can vary depending on the capacity of the chair or carrier. Larger carriers operate at lower speeds than smaller ones. For example, a double chairlift will run faster than a quad chairlift.
by Shane Séguin
The world's first detachable quad chairlift was installed in 1981 at Breckenridge in Colorado. It was known as the Quicksilver Superchair. It was later replaced and relocated to Owl's Head in Québec under the name Lake Chair.
by Shane Séguin

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Dedicated to getting you up close and personal with skiing and adventure
© SlopeEdge - 2007-2019

 

About Us   |   Contact Us   |   FAQ   |   Our Team   |   Ski Lift Videos
Cookie Policy   |   Terms of Use   |   Privacy Policy
Dedicated to getting you up close and personal with skiing and adventure
© SlopeEdge - 2007-2019

About Us
   |   Cookie Policy   |  Contact Us   |   FAQ   |   Our Team   |   Privacy Policy   |   Ski Lift Videos   |   Terms of Use   |   Update SC

Dedicated to getting you up close and personal with skiing and adventure
© SlopeEdge - 2007-2019